Updated February 1, 2017
BRANCH: R

AGE: 55,000 YEARS AGO

LOCATION OF ORIGIN: WEST ASIA


After their stretch in Mesopotamia, they felt a need for more of a bitter cold, demanding place to live. They moved not merely to Russia, but to Northern Russia. In the ice age with its host of wall-to-wall crises! While there, they learned problem-solving techniques and this got on their alleles as well as their nerves. This photograph and all others in this site that are not National Geographic's™ are by Barney Crosby.

But seriously now, let's turn the narrative over to National Geographic™:

After several thousand years in the Near East, individuals belonging to a new group called haplogroup R began to move out and explore the surrounding areas. Some moved south, migrating back into northern Africa. Others went west across Anatolia (present-day Turkey) and north across the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia and southern Russia. Still others headed east into the Middle East, and on to Central Asia. All of these individuals had one thing in common: they shared a female ancestor from the N clan, a recent descendant of the migration out of Africa.

The story of haplogroup R is complicated, however, because these individuals can be found almost everywhere, and because their origin is quite ancient. In fact, the ancestor of haplogroup R lived relatively soon after humans moved out of Africa during the second wave, and her descendants undertook many of the same migrations as her own group, N.

Because the two groups lived side by side for thousands of years, it is likely that the migrations radiating out from the Near East comprised individuals from both of these groups. They simply moved together, bringing their N and R lineages to the same places around the same times. The tapestry of genetic lines became quickly entangled, and geneticists are currently working to unravel the different stories of haplogroups N and R, since they are found in many of the same far-reaching places.

Descendants of this line dominate the European maternal landscape, making up 75 to 95 percent of the lineages there.

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Copyright © 2017 by Robert Ranger, Wilmington, North Carolina.